The Current Status of the U.S. Presidential Campaign: More of Trump VS. Biden

 

Photo credits: ballotpedia.org

 

It is now just a week and a few days away to meet the next leader of the United States. The election for the White House seat will be held on the 3rd of November 2020. Then the elected president will be sworn into office on the 20thof January 2021.

 

The COVID-19 pandemic has thrown many aspects of the presidential rivals into uncertainty. U.S. President Donald Trump has been receiving hates for Novel Coronavirus mismanagement. At least 223,000 Americans had died, millions of jobs were gone and 100,000 small businesses were closed. Trump, himself, was diagnosed with the COVID-19. The election day is also unclear knowing the risk of virus transmissions by voting personally.

 

U.S. Former President, Barack Obama, campaigned his former Vice President and Democratic nominee Joe Biden. He criticized Trump’s handling of the Coronavirus crisis. Obama compared South Korea and Canada’s way of handling the pandemic to the U.S.  which has been far worse in terms of mortality and infections. “Donald Trump wants to take full credit for the economy he inherited and no responsibility for the pandemic he ignored,” he stated. He guaranteed Biden’s virtue, asserting he has empathy and respectability. Obama said that Biden and his running vice president. Kamala Harris would expand public health insurance and create green jobs.

 

Joe Biden is currently leading the 2020 US election polls. The national presidential polls look good for Biden, but it doesn’t mean that he will surely get the victory. According to BBC News, the polls suggest that Biden has big leads in Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin – three industrial states his Republican rival won by margins of less than 1% to clinch victory in 2016. But it’s the battleground states where Trump won big in 2016 that his campaign team will be most worried about. His winning margin in Iowa, Ohio, and Texas was between 8-10% back then but it’s looking much closer in all three at the moment. That’s one of the reasons why some political analysts rate his chances of re-election as low as things stand.

 

Photo credits: bbc.com
Photo credits: bbc.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the other hand, Trump’s campaign is short of cash. His campaign began in October with $63 million in the bank, compared to Joe Biden’s $177 million. To make it even worse, Biden doesn’t have to spend a penny in the most-expensive swing state, Florida, because Michael Bloomberg has that covered. When the party committees and super PACs are factored in, Biden had $432 million to Trump’s $251 million, but the campaign’s actual cash on hand is more important than what affiliated groups have. Among other things, campaigns can buy television time cheaper than super PACs and they can decide which states they want to focus on; super PACs may have other ideas. (electoral-vote.com)

 

 

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